TRISTAN PERICH: OCTAVE
May
28
Jun 25

TRISTAN PERICH: OCTAVE

  • Kitchener Public Library
Credit: New Westminster Media Gallery

Credit: New Westminster Media Gallery

Octave is a whimsical and ingenious embodiment of pitch as a macroscopic and microscopic event. Octave consists of 300 speakers projecting 300 different frequencies which are distributed at equal distances and in ascending order at the length of one octave from Do to Do or C to C. Each one of the 12 panels in which the piece is divided comprises a semi-tone (one could say that they correspond to the 12 musical notes of an octave on a piano) : the speaker on the bottom left of the first panel sounds at C, the second panel C#, the third D, and so forth. Each microtonally tuned speaker is independent but combines to form coherency.  Stand back and hear white noise, draw closer and hear pitch coalesce, travel up and down and experience the individual personalities of each tone and their relationship to each other.

TRISTAN PERICH

Tristan Perich‘s (New York) work is inspired by the aesthetic simplicity of math, physics and code.

The WIRE Magazine describes his compositions as "an austere meeting of electronic and organic." 1-Bit Music, his 2004 release, was the first album ever released as a microchip, programmed to synthesize his electronic composition live. His latest circuit album, 1-Bit Symphony (Cantaloupe, 2010) has received critical acclaim, called "sublime" (New York Press), and the Wall Street Journal said "its oscillations have an intense, hypnotic force and a surprising emotional depth." His works for soloist, ensemble and orchestra have been performed internationally by ensembles including Bang on a Can, Calder Quartet, Eighth Blackbird at venues from the Whitney Museum and Mass MoCA to Sonar and Ars Electronica. He has received commissions from Bang on a Can, Meehan/Perkins Duo, Dither Quartet, Yarn/Wire, and others.

 

 

TRISTAN PERICH: MACHINE DRAWINGS
May
28
Jun 26

TRISTAN PERICH: MACHINE DRAWINGS

  • Open Sesame Gallery

Over the course of a month, a simple machine will create a randomly-derived piece of artwork on a gallery wall. Watch the unpredictable movements of a pen in space create something completely new and wonderful.

MACHINE DRAWINGS

 

Tristan Perich’s live machine drawings and works on paper explore texture, noise and order. They are created with a pen suspended from two motors, whose motion is controlled by code running on a circuit. The choreography of each drawing is programmed based on randomness and algorithms, then executed in physical space by the machine. The path of the pen, a continuous line comprised of thousands to millions of miniature movements, gradually builds the image. Simple geometric structures emerge from densely packed lines and random marks, as the linear repetition is woven back into itself, recursively. The final drawings are wedded to effects from the physical world: the ripple of the string connecting pen to motor, the gradual depletion of ink, the texture of the paper.

As the machine delicately travels and draws over a clean white wall at Open Sesame in the Kitchener Civic Square over the space of four weeks, one can wonder where the human artist ends and the machine takes over.

“The Machine Drawings—pen on paper or wall drawings executed by a machine that I designed and built—employ randomness and order as raw materials within a visual composition. I see randomness and order as occupying opposite ends of a continuous spectrum, and I use them to dictate the immediate motion of the pen. Varying levels of randomness—the probability the pen will change direction—produces the difference between straight lines or dense frenetic motion. While the motors' movements are the result of code executed precisely by machine, the final drawings come from the motion of pen on surface, and are wedded to effects from the physical world: the ripple of the string connecting pen to motor, the gradual depletion of ink, the texture of the paper. It is this balance between code and physics that excites me most, since the drawings couldn't be made without the code, and code needs to be realized in the physical world in order to be more than a set of instructions.”  

- Tristan Perich

TRISTAN PERICH

Tristan Perich‘s (New York) work is inspired by the aesthetic simplicity of math, physics and code.

The WIRE Magazine describes his compositions as "an austere meeting of electronic and organic." 1-Bit Music, his 2004 release, was the first album ever released as a microchip, programmed to synthesize his electronic composition live. His latest circuit album, 1-Bit Symphony (Cantaloupe, 2010) has received critical acclaim, called "sublime" (New York Press), and the Wall Street Journal said "its oscillations have an intense, hypnotic force and a surprising emotional depth." His works for soloist, ensemble and orchestra have been performed internationally by ensembles including Bang on a Can, Calder Quartet, Eighth Blackbird at venues from the Whitney Museum and Mass MoCA to Sonar and Ars Electronica. He has received commissions from Bang on a Can, Meehan/Perkins Duo, Dither Quartet, Yarn/Wire, and others.

 

As a visual artist, Perich has had solo exhibitions at bitforms gallery (NYC), Mikrogalleriet (Copenhagen), Museo Carandente (Spoleto), The Addison Gallery (Massachusetts), Katonah Museum (New York), Monster Truck (Dublin), LEAP (Berlin) among others, as well as group shows around the world. His Machine Drawings, pen-on-paper drawings executed by machine, are described as "elegantly delicate" by BOMB Magazine.

Perich was a featured artist at Sonár 2010 in Barcelona, and in 2009, the Prix Ars Electronica awarded him the Award of Distinction for his composition Active Field (for ten violins and ten-channel 1-bit music). Rhizome awarded him a 2010 commission for Microtonal Wall, an audio installation with 1,500 speakers. Perich attended the first Bang on a Can Summer Institute in 2002. He was artist in residence at Issue Project Room in 2008, at Mikrogalleriet in Copenhagen in 2010, at the Addison Gallery in Andover, MA and Harvestworks in New York in Fall 2010, and at the Watermill Center in 2012. His work has received support from New York State Council on the Arts, the American Music Center, Meet the Composer and others. He has spoken about his work and taught workshops around the world.

Perich studied math, music and computer science at Columbia University, and received a masters in from the Interactive Telecommunications Program at Tisch School of the Arts, NYU.

TRISTAN PERICH: 1-BIT SYMPHONY and 0.01s
May
28
Jun 26

TRISTAN PERICH: 1-BIT SYMPHONY and 0.01s

  • Open Sesame Gallery

RETHINK the symphony, REWIRE the CD jewel case!

1-BIT SYMPHONY

1-Bit Symphony is an electronic composition in five movements on a single microchip. Though housed in a CD jewel case, 1-Bit Symphony is not a recording in the traditional sense; it literally "performs" its music live when turned on. A complete electronic circuit—programmed by the artist and assembled by hand—plays the music through a headphone jack mounted into the case itself.

A return to the format of Perich's lauded 1-Bit Music (described by the Village Voice as "technology and aesthetic rolled into one"), 1-Bit Symphony further reduces the hardware involved while simultaneously expanding its musical ideas. 1-Bit Symphony utilizes on and off electrical pulses, synthesized by assembly code and routed from microchip to speaker, to manifest data as sound. The device treats electricity as a sonic medium, making an intimate connection between the materiality of hardware and the abstract logic of software.

While 1-Bit Symphony is purely electronic in its execution, its contents reflect Perich's long-standing interest in orchestral composition. Since the release of 1-Bit Music in 2006, Perich's compositional work has combined 1-bit audio with acoustic classical instruments, providing insight into the conceptual and aesthetic relationships between physical and electronic sound. With 1-Bit Symphony, Perich brings this insight back into the digital realm, juxtaposing the grand form of a classical symphony with the minimal nature of 1-bit circuitry.

0.01s, Perich's new companion to 1-Bit Symphony, is an impressive synthesis of art and computation in book form, giving a tangible mass to the code behinds its music. Digging even deeper into the basic operations of computation, 0.01s captures the inner workings of 1-Bit Symphony over the first hundredth of a second after it is switched on. In just 0.01 seconds, its processor executes 80,000 computational cycles, enough information to fill a 695-page book with austere tables of numbers and machine language, becoming a visual meditation on the internal mechanics of computation.

Good things can come in small, jewel case-sized packages. It’s a perfect model of how art can take and combine long-existing technology, turn it on its head and create something completely surprising that will make you rethink everyday objects.

NOTE: Copies of 1-Bit Symphony and 0.01s will be available for purchase at Open Sesame Gallery.

CREATED BY Tristan Perich
PRODUCTION MANAGER: Annie Chen
PRODUCTION ASSISTANCE: Argeo Ascani, Theo Baer, Daniel Fishkin, Damon Hardjowirogo, Kathleen McDermont, Seyhan Musaoglu, Jess Ramsay, Brian Shaw, Nick Shifrin, Jasmine Dreame Wagner, Owen Weaver, Alex Wilson
MADE POSSIBLE WITH GENEROUS SUPPORT FROM Nailya Alexander, Candace Dwan, Virginia Dwan, Warren Fischer, Oscar Gerardo, Kunal Gupta, Bob Holman, Karen Japenjie, Allison Kemmerer, Miru Kim, Wynn Kramarsky, Suzanne Bocanegra and David Lang, Myo-On-Susan Linnell, John Mannix, William McGowan, Evelyn and Alan Meyers, Paul D. Miller, Edward Nersessian and Mary LuAllen, Anton Perich, Jonathan Rose, Joseph Saidock and Jaclyn Flanigan, Bernard Francis Kyle and James Schmidt, Michael Straus, Scott Varland, Gian Pablo Villamil, Laban Wingert

TRISTAN PERICH

Tristan Perich‘s (New York) work is inspired by the aesthetic simplicity of math, physics and code. The WIRE Magazine describes his compositions as "an austere meeting of electronic and organic." 1-Bit Music, his 2004 release, was the first album ever released as a microchip, programmed to synthesize his electronic composition live. His latest circuit album, 1-Bit Symphony (Cantaloupe, 2010) has received critical acclaim, called "sublime" (New York Press), and the Wall Street Journal said "its oscillations have an intense, hypnotic force and a surprising emotional depth." His works for soloist, ensemble and orchestra have been performed internationally by ensembles including Bang on a Can, Calder Quartet, Eighth Blackbird at venues from the Whitney Museum and Mass MoCA to Sonar and Ars Electronica. He has received commissions from Bang on a Can, Meehan/Perkins Duo, Dither Quartet, Yarn/Wire, and others.

As a visual artist, Perich has had solo exhibitions at bitforms gallery (NYC), Mikrogalleriet (Copenhagen), Museo Carandente (Spoleto), The Addison Gallery (Massachusetts), Katonah Museum (New York), Monster Truck (Dublin), LEAP (Berlin) among others, as well as group shows around the world. His Machine Drawings, pen-on-paper drawings executed by machine, are described as "elegantly delicate" by BOMB Magazine.

Perich was a featured artist at Sonár 2010 in Barcelona, and in 2009, the Prix Ars Electronica awarded him the Award of Distinction for his composition Active Field (for ten violins and ten-channel 1-bit music). Rhizome awarded him a 2010 commission for Microtonal Wall, an audio installation with 1,500 speakers. Perich attended the first Bang on a Can Summer Institute in 2002. He was artist in residence at Issue Project Room in 2008, at Mikrogalleriet in Copenhagen in 2010, at the Addison Gallery in Andover, MA and Harvestworks in New York in Fall 2010, and at the Watermill Center in 2012. His work has received support from New York State Council on the Arts, the American Music Center, Meet the Composer and others. He has spoken about his work and taught workshops around the world.

Perich studied math, music and computer science at Columbia University, and received a masters in from the Interactive Telecommunications Program at Tisch School of the Arts, NYU.

RYAN MAGUIRE: THE GHOST IN THE MP3
May
28
Jun 26

RYAN MAGUIRE: THE GHOST IN THE MP3

  • Open Sesame Gallery

REMIX discarded data into something altogether new.

The lost pixels from compressed images of Tom's Diner.

The lost pixels from compressed images of Tom's Diner.

THE GHOST IN THE MP3

In The Ghost in the MP3, Ryan Maguire explores what is lost when we take sound waves and pack them into tiny digital containers, by lovingly reconstructing the sonic detritus of compression. It is a record of things considered expendable in this MP3 era.

"moDernisT" was created by salvaging the sounds and images lost to compression via the MP3 and MP4 codecs. The audio is comprised of lost mp3 compression material from the song "Tom's Diner" famously used as one of the main controls in the listening tests to develop the MP3 encoding algorithm. Here we find the form of the song intact, but the details are just remnants of the original. The video is the MP4 ghost of a corresponding video created in collaboration with Takahiro Suzuki. Thus, both audio and video are the "ghosts" of their respective compression codecs.

Check out this installation if you prefer vinyl to iTunes, love sifting through cardboard-covered music at record stores or want to strike a blow against Skynet.

RYAN MAGUIRE | artist

Inspired by the infinity of the cosmos, the indeterminacy of the subatomic, and the complexity of life, Ryan Maguire explores the boundaries between the natural world, human experience, and the technologies that act as intermediaries between the two. His work is equal parts technical virtuosity and folk humanism, blurring lines between composition & improvisation, sound & video, acoustic & electric, deterministic & stochastic, fabricated & hand-crafted, analog & digital, lo-fi & high tech, and ultimately between poetry & science. He plays stringed instruments and programs computers, molds materials and builds circuits, writes essays and sings songs. Currently a Ph.D. student in Composition and Computer Technologies at the University of Virginia, Ryan earned his B.A. in Physics and taught math before completing postgraduate degrees at the New England Conservatory of Music and Dartmouth College in Composition and Digital Musics, respectively.

 

GIF REEL: PEOPLE OF THE FUTURE
May
27
Jun 26

GIF REEL: PEOPLE OF THE FUTURE

  • Kitchener Sky Gallery

LOOK! UP IN THE SKY! 

It's a bird

It's a plane

It's a...GIF REEL!

When Open Ears wanted to animate the Cube in City Hall with a reel of GIFs that would tie-in to our festival theme - ReReRe - we immediately appealed to Karie Liao, former artistic director of CAFKA, for help in creating something weird and wonderful. Take a moment during the installation dates to look up and see something you've never, ever seen before.

CURATORIAL STATEMENT

People of the Future is a curated series of GIFs inspired by synesthesia, a condition in which the response of one sense is met with the experience of another; “feeling” images, “smelling” sounds, or “tasting” colours. This GIF reel is comprised of recent and new works by Jennifer Chan (Toronto), Clint Enns (Toronto), Winston Hacking (Toronto), Alison S.M. Kobayashi (Toronto/New York), Jodie Mack (Chicago/Vermont), and Phillip David Stearns (New York).

 Although these artists have practices with distinct styles and processes, their work often incorporates found materials, animation, video, film, and new media, and shares the strong characteristic of heightened visual and visceral tactility. Winston Hacking and Jodie Mack employ handmade and analog animation techniques in their GIFs that mimic the characteristics of modern technology. Similarly, Alison S.M. Kobayashi’s GIFs incorporates retro technology but focuses on the hidden narratives found in these discarded objects. Like the other three artists, Jennifer Chan and Clint Enns are cultural scavengers. They appropriate found imagery and employ amateur aesthetics to create GIFs that critique media conventions and Internet culture, conjuring mixed feelings of suspended disbelief, nostalgia, humour, and discomfort. Phillip Stearns’ featured work is an investigation of computerized vision and behavior. His GIFs resonate with natural cyclical processes and anthropomorphic qualities that evoke a sense of familiarity and synchronized rhythm in the viewer. These visually affective and engaging GIFs will be exhibited on The Cube, an immense two-sided projected surface located high atop Kitchener City Hall. The Cube can be seen for miles. This GIF reel will provide much-needed creative visual excitement in the current day-to-day landscape of ubiquitous mundane commercial digital imagery.

In some sense those who experience synesthesia can be considered “people of the future” as they are able to experience reality in more forms than the average person. In our current digital age, saturated with sound and imagery, this series of GIFs may stimulate onlookers’ intuition and articulate a hypothetical future, in which we are all synesthetes experiencing our surroundings in an even more complete way.

GIF reel includes: 

1.     Fluctuation, Phillip David Stearns

2.     3D GIF/Chromaflex Loop/ Confused Rain/ Debbie Does ASCII (loop)/ Decay Loop/ Self Improvement (Loop)/ UFO, Clint Enns

3.     Forced Reps, Winston Hacking

4.     Cam Twist, Jennifer Chan

5.     Desperate, Jennifer Chan

6.     Webster Chicago, Alison S.M. Kobayashi

7.     Unsubscribe #3: Glitch Envy, Jodie Mack

8.     Lament II, Phillip David Stearns

ARTIST BIOGRAPHIES

JENNIFER CHAN (Toronto) is an artist who makes remix videos, GIFs and websites that contend with the confused messages of race and gender in media culture. Her work often involves decontextualized online imagery that reflects and remixes the accelerated attention spans created by the online environment. Her kitschy remix videos resonate with her active and irreverent engagement with social politics and qtwoc (queer/trans/women of colour) feminism on the Internet.

Chan has had solo presentations at Western Front (Vancouver), Transmediale 2013 (Germany), Future Gallery (Berlin), The Nightingale (Chicago), Images Festival (Toronto), Vox Populi (Philadelphia), LTD (Los Angeles) and Galleri CC (Malmo). Her work has been featured in Art Forum, Rhizome, Leap, Furtherfield, Sleek Magazine, and Dazed Digital. She recently produced commissions for Artslant, Mexico Projects and Kunsthaus Langenthal.

For Open Ears, Chan will exhibit Cam Twist (2013) and Desperate (2015), two GIFs that are self-portraits for the artist but also act as a metaphor for mainstream perceptions of self-representation in the Internet age. Cam Twist depicts a distorted moving image of the artist, which serves as Chan’s critique of “selfie” culture and exploration of meaning behind her own digital reflection. Desperate is the result of an image search for “idealized masculinity” by the artist for a recent video project. During that search she found a stock image that illustrated her failed heterosexuality; a “3D rendering muscle man hugging woman from behind.” Chan sympathized with the muscle man in the image and saw herself reflected in him.

CLINT ENNS (Toronto) is a video artist and filmmaker. His work primarily deals with moving images created with broken and/or outdated technologies. His work has shown both nationally and internationally at festivals, alternative spaces and micro-cinemas.      

Enns’ work critiques vision and encourages different ways of seeing. He often employs retro technology to abstract, echo, and remix images, some of which are taken from his own cameras, others from video games and online sources. Through de-contextualization Enn’s obscures familiar imagery and the logic of media conventions. He has had solo retrospectives in Winnipeg, Brooklyn, Austin, and Ottawa. Enn’s holds a Master’s degree in mathematics from the University of Manitoba, and has recently received a Master’s degree in cinema and media from York University where he is currently pursuing a PhD. 

For Open Ears, Enns will create new work. His GIF is informed by past work including Let Me ASMR You (2014), a rhythm study using ASMR (Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response) inducing sounds from videos found on Youtube. Though silent, Enns’ GIF for The Cube will use found and familiar imagery to create an intimate yet uncanny, multi-sensory experience for the onlooker.

WINSTON HACKING (Toronto) is a mixed media artist, filmmaker, and art director best known for his work with stop-motion animation, puppets and miniatures. He is invested in exploring new mediums while paying tribute to the innovations of the past. Working in mixed media, Hacking has produced dynamic workshops and interactive content for TIFF Bell Lightbox, The Royal Ontario Museum, the History Channel, and TVO, all of which combine classic animation techniques with new technology.

In the past, Hacking has directed many memorable music videos for a number of renown Canadian musicians including Timber Timbre, Austra, and One Hundred Dollars just to name a few. His work has garnered millions of views online and has been featured on television (Much Music, MTV) as well as on art and culture blogs (Boooooom!, Vice, Rolling Stone, New York Times). Over the past 2 years, he has also worked closely with Taqqut Productions in Iqaluit, creating sets for television pilots and assisting the development of their art department. In 2013, he was the assistant art director for the stop motion unit of the feature film The Little Prince released in 2015. He is currently collaborating with filmmaker Brett Long on a stop motion animated virtual reality experience funded by the Canada Arts Council.

For Open Ears, Hacking has proposed to create new work entitled Forced Reps. This project is an attempt to mimic the looping characteristic of a GIF through analog, physical movement.  Hacking will create "paper-teered" GIFs by moving collaged images by hand. He will move these collages with a repeated motion simulating a loop. The repeated action is precise at first but eventually as his hands tire, the illusion of the loop is broken and the collage falls apart.  This “analog GIF” is homage to traditional forms of animation but also a test of endurance for the artist.

JODIE MACK (Chicago/Vermont) is an experimental animator who received her MFA in film, video, and new media from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2007 and currently teaches animation at Dartmouth College. Combining the formal techniques and structures of abstract/absolute animation with those of cinematic genres, her handmade films use collage to explore the relationship between graphic cinema and storytelling, the tension between form and meaning. Musical documentary or stroboscopic archive; her films study domestic and recycled materials to illuminate the elements shared between fine-art abstraction and mass-produced graphic design. Questioning the role of decoration in daily life, the works unleash the kinetic energy of overlooked and wasted objects.

Mack's 16mm films have screened at a variety of venues including the Images Festival, Ann Arbor Film Festival, Rotterdam Film Festival, Edinburgh International Film Festival, and Views From the Avant Garde at the New York Film Festival. She has presented solo programs of her work at venues such as the Anthology Film Archives, Los Angeles Filmforum, REDCAT, and the BFI London Film Festival. She has also worked as a curator and administrator with Dartmouth's EYEWASH: Experimental Films and Videos, Florida Experimental Film and Video Festival, Portland Documentary and Experimental Film Festival, Eye and Ear Clinic, Chicago Underground Film Festival, and The Nightingale. She was a featured artist at the 2011 Flaherty Seminar, and she’s the 2013 recipient of the Marion McMahan Award at the Images Festival.

For Open Ears, Mack will create a new GIF that echoes her past works including Film Still (33) -Unsubscribe #3: Glitch Envy (2010, 16mm, 5m45s, colour, sound), an experimental animation the uses junk mail detritus to create a handicraft salute to new media.

ALISON S. M. KOBAYASHI (Toronto/New York) is an identity contortionist. In her work, Kobayashi performs a variety of characters that are both studiously and playfully rendered. These personas are inspired by Kobayashi’s extensive collection of lost, discarded and donated objects; ranging from answering machine tapes purchased at a secondhand shop to a love letter left on a sidewalk. Through repeated interaction with the objects — deep listening, research, re-enactment and play — narratives and imagery begin to manifest and inspire new work. The results are funny, low-fi artifacts of an artist embodying the lives of others.

Kobayashi’s short videos have been exhibited and screened widely in Canada, the United States and overseas. She was a guest artist at the 2008 Flaherty Film Seminar and her body of work was a Spotlight Presentation at Video Out, Jakarta International Film Festival, Indonesia and is a 2016 MacDowell Colony fellow. In 2012, she was commissioned by Les Subsistances in Lyon, France to produce her first live performance, Defense Mechanism. Alison S. M Kobayashi was born in Mississauga, Ontario and is based in Toronto and Brooklyn, NY where she is the Director of Special Projects at UnionDocs, Center for Documentary Art.

For Open Ears, Kobayashi will create new work. The artist’s proposed GIF is based on the now defunct mid-century audio recording device called a wire recorder. Over the past year she has developed an installation and performance based on two reels hidden inside one of these machines, which was purchased at an estate sale in New York. The recordings capture the voices of a New York family spanning 1952 to 1954. The narrative contained in the recording is a puzzle peppered with fragmented and overlapping dialogue, a charming living room drama rich with the eccentricities of family dynamics performed for the tape recorder. Decoding the document and using it as both soundtrack and inspiration, Kobayashi has created a new installation containing videos, drawings and a book work that reimagine the events, characters, and references from the recording. Kobayashi’s new GIF for The Cube will be a part of this greater body of work.

 PHILLIP DAVID STEARNS (USA, 1982)

I work with electronic technologies and media as tools to explore dynamic relationships between ideas and material as mobilized within complex and interconnected societies. Deconstruction, reconfiguration, and extension are key methodologies and techniques I employ in the production of works that range from audio visual performances, electronic sculptures, light and sound installation, digital textiles, and other oddities both digital and material. I received my MFA in music composition and integrated media from the California Institute of Arts in 2007 and BS in music technology from the University of Colorado at Denver in 2005.

My work has been exhibited internationally at electronics arts festivals, museums, and galleries including: SCAD Gutstein Gallery (2015), Tate Britain (2014), Turku Biennial (2013), WRO Biennale (2013), Transmediale (2013), Denver Art Museum (2013), The Photographer’s Gallery London (2012), The Camera Club of New York (2012), Eyebeam (2012, 2007), Harvestworks (2010, 2012), Gli.tc/H 2112 (2012), Festival De Arte Digital (2010), FILE (2009), NIME (2009), Filmer La Musique (2009),Torrance Art Museum (2008, 2007), Optica Film Festival (2011 & 2008). I've has participated in residencies at the Making Lab of the 4th APAP ( Korea 2013), Textielmuseum in Tilburg, NL (2013), Institute for Electronic Arts (2012, 2013), Museums Quartier (Vienna 2010), STEIM (Amsterdam 2007, 2013), Experimental Television Center (2009), Harvestworks (NY 2010), Free103Point9 (2012). I've presented and led workshops at several international institutions including the Athens Video Art Festival (2014), Universidad De Chile (Santiago 2013), Santiago Maker Space (2013), Pomona College (2013), Recyclism Hacklab (Dublin 2013), and the Science Gallery (Dublin 2013).

CURATOR BIOGRAPHY

Karie Liao (B.A., 2008, Art History and Cultural Studies, McGill University; M.A., 2011, Art History and Curatorial Studies, York University) is a community-driven contemporary art curator based in Toronto and Cape Breton. Currently, she is the Curator at Cape Breton University Art Gallery (Sydney, NS). In the past, she has held the position of Resident Curator at Artscape Youngplace (2014-2015), organizing contemporary art projects, including exhibitions, artist talks, publications, and artist-community collaborations. From 2013-2014, she was the Artistic Director of Contemporary Art Forum Kitchener and Area where she worked alongside Executive Director Gordon Hatt and the CAFKA Committees to organize CAFKA.14, a biennial exhibition of large-scale art installations in atria, storefronts, parks and other public spaces throughout Kitchener and the surrounding region. Artists include Krzysztof Wodiczko, Mary Mattingly, Robert Seidel, Seripop, and Steve Lambert, among others. As Curatorial Resident at the Textile Museum of Canada (2013-2014), she worked with Executive Director Shauna McCabe and the curatorial team, and curated the exhibition “Wanderlust,” featuring work by Jordan Bennett, the Color Collective, and NorBlack NorWhite. She has completed internships at the former Jessica Bradley Inc. (Toronto, ON), Creative Time (New York, NY), Deitch Projects (New York, NY), the former Liane and Danny Taran Gallery of the Saidye Bronfman Centre for the Arts (Montreal, QC), and Dare-Dare – Centre de diffusion d'art multidisciplinaire de Montréal (Montreal, QC).